A major new analysis links increased omega-3 intake to cardioprotection and improved cardiovascular outcomes.

Study shows that EPA and given Supplementation reduces several types of cardiovascular risk, according to the Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

A new study published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings offers the most comprehensive analysis yet of the role of omega-3 dosing in cardiovascular prevention. The meta-analysis, which is an in-depth review of 40 clinical studies, provides authoritative evidence for the use of more EPA (eicosapentaenoic) acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) omega-3 fats.

The study concludes that EPA and DHA omega-3 intake are associated with a reduced risk of coronary artery disease (CHD) events, the cause of 7.4 million deaths worldwide each year, and a reduced risk of myocardial infarction (heart attack) , including fatal heart attacks.

In particular, the study found that EPA + DHA supplementation is associated with a statistically significantly reduced risk of:

  • Fatal myocardial infarction (35 percent)
  • Myocardial infarction (13 percent)
  • CHD events (10 percent)
  • CHD mortality (9 percent)

“The study supports the belief that EPA and DHA intake help cardioprotection and that patients who come on the diet are likely to need more,” said Dr. Carl “Chip” Lavie, cardiologist at Ochsner Health in New Orleans, LA, USA, and one of the study’s authors.

Cardiovascular benefit appears to increase with dosage. The researchers found that adding an extra 1,000 mg of EPA and DHA per day reduced the risk of cardiovascular disease and heart attack even further: the risk of cardiovascular disease decreased by 5.8 percent and the risk of Heart attacks by 9.0 percent. The study looked at dosages of up to 5500 mg / day.

This study confirms the results of an earlier meta-analysis by the Harvard School of Public Health, published in Fall 2019, that looked at EPA and DHA dosages across the 13 largest clinical studies. This new paper covers more than three times the number of studies, which is the entirety of previous evidence and includes more than 135,000 study participants.

“If separate analyzes lead to similar results, this is not just validation. This also underscores the scientific basis needed to inform about future intake recommendations, ”said co-author Aldo Bernasconi, PhD, vice president of data science at the Global Organization for EPA and DHA Omega-3 Fatty Acids (GOED), Salt Lake City, UT, USA who commissioned this study. “As this paper included more studies and all doses, the estimates for dose-response are more precise and the conclusions stronger.”

EPA and DHA omega-3 fatty acids are long-chain, marine-based fatty acids. Eating fish, especially oily fish like salmon, anchovies, and sardines, is the optimal way to get EPA and DHA omega-3 fatty acids, as fish provides other beneficial nutrients as well. However, most people around the world eat much less than the recommended amount of fish. Therefore, supplementing with omega-3 fatty acids helps fill the void.

“People should consider the benefits of omega-3 supplements at doses of 1000 to 2000 mg per day – far higher than usual, even in people who eat fish regularly,” added Dr. Lavie added. “Given their safety and reduced potential for interaction with other drugs, the positive results of this study strongly suggest that omega-3 supplements are a relatively inexpensive and effective way to improve heart health with few associated risks, and as part of it Standard preventive care for most patients with cardiovascular disease and for patients recovering from myocardial infarction. “

Reference: “Effect of Omega-3 Dosage on Cardiovascular Outcomes: An Updated Meta-Analysis and Meta-Regression of Interventional Studies” by Aldo A. Bernasconi, PhD; Michelle M. Wiest, PhD; Carl J. Lavie, MD; Richard V. Milani, MD; and Jari A. Laukkanen, MD, PhD, September 17, 2020, Mayo Clinic Proceedings.
DOI: 10.1016 / j.mayocp.2020.08.034

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